Conferences and Symposia

Mentoring Bibliography

Mentoring Bibliography


Books


ABA Career Resources Center, Best Practices in Attorney Professional Development (2004).


Ida O. Abbott, The lawyers Guide to Mentoring (2002).


Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs in Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (1997).


The Handbook of Mentoring at Work: Research and Practice (B.R. Ragins & E.E. Kram eds. 2007).


JOMA, Law Firm Training Professional Development Best Practices (2007).


Kathy E. Kram, Mentoring at Work: Developmental Relationships in Organizational Life (1985).


Margo Murray & Marna A. Owen, Beyond the Myths and Magic of Mentoring: How to Facilitate an Effective Mentoring Program (1991).


Book Chapters 


Dawn E. Candler & Kathy E. Kram, Mentoring and Developmental Networks in the New Career Context, in H. Gune & M. Peiperl, Handbook of Career Studies (2005).


How Two Companies Make Mentoring Matter, from the Bottom to the Top, Managing Training & Development (2005) (Westlaw search by citation: 2005 WLNR 6737378).


Mentoring is making a difference in organizations that recognize how powerful such programs can be.  Intel is one of the best examples of the power of employee mentoring.  Blank Rome, a law firm of more than 450 lawyers, also has an award winning mentoring program.  This article takes a look at Blank Rome and Intel’s mentoring practices and offers suggestions for fine-tuning your own mentoring program.


K.E. Kram & M.C. Bragar, Development through Mentoring: A Strategic Approach, in Career Development: Theory and Practice (D.H. Montross & C.J. Shinkman eds.) (1991).


Articles


Ida O. Abbott, Evaluating Mentoring Programs, Management Solutions (Winter 2006), at http://www.idaabbott.com/new/news13.html.


Ida Abbott explains the purpose behind regularly evaluating mentoring programs and how to conduct those evaluations.


Ida O. Abbott and Rita S. Boag, Mentoring Across Differences: A Guide to Cross-Gender and Cross-Race Mentoring, at http://www.mcca.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewpage&pageid=666.


Abbott and Boag share their findings from a year-long study of mentoring relationships in law firms and law departments.  They offer recommendations for mentees and mentors in diverse mentoring relationships, recommendations to employers for supporting mentoring across differences, a checklist for establishing a mentoring program in law firms, and a core training curriculum for a mentoring program.


Ida O. Abbott, Mentoring Across Differences: Mentoring Bridges the Generation Gap, Diversity & the Bar (July/August 2006), at http://www.mcca.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewpage&pageid=959.


Mentoring is a way of bridging the generation gap between older and younger lawyers.  Mentors who are receptive to new ways of thinking can use mentoring relationships to build commitment and loyalty in their associates.


Ida O. Abbott, Mentors Are Yours for the Asking, 26 San Francisco Attorney 25, (2000) (LexisNexis search by citation: 26 San Francisco Att’y 25).


Lawyers who are alert to mentoring opportunities and who are committed to building a positive reputation are able to find mentors on their own.  Potential mentors exist beyond a limited pool of senior partners or lawyers in the same firm.


Ida O. Abbott, Mentoring Points, 892 Practicing Law Institute, Patents, Copyrights, Trademarks, and Literary Property 97 (2007) (Westlaw search by citation: 892 PLI/Pat 97).


Excerpts from Ida Abbott’s quarterly electronic newsletter are presented to share her ideas regarding the purpose of mentoring, mentor-mentee matchmaking, the need for careful planning when establishing mentoring groups and mentoring circles, evaluating mentoring programs, and evaluating mentoring relationships.


Martha Fay Africa, Do-It-Yourself Mentoring, 19 G.P. Solo 42 (2002) (LexisNexis search by citation: 19 GPSolo 42).


Whether a new attorney is working for a large firm or a small one, he may find the need to take charge of his own education and serve as his own mentor in learning how to be an effective lawyer.  This article provides suggestions for how to fill in those educational gaps.


Jack W. Burtch, Jr., The Mentor Challenge in Changing Times, 15 Experience 10 (2004) (Westlaw search by citation: 15-FALL Experience 10).


Given increased time pressures and a focus on the billable hour, the need for competent mentoring is greater now than ever before.  Teaching new lawyers the practical and ethical aspects of law is a challenge when facing such powerful economic forces.  Law schools, law firms, and bar associations have accepted the challenge, encouraging mentors and mentoring programs to adapt their traditional styles to fit a modern practice of law.


Paul Burton, Mentoring Your Practice: What Money Can’t Buy: A Strategy to Reintroduce Organic Mentoring in Firms, 67 The Oregon State Bar Bulletin 33 (2006) (LexisNexis search by citation: 67 Or. St. B. Bull. 33).


Mid-level and senior associates are leaving prestigious, high-paying positions in droves to pursue more collegial environments.  This is not a phase, affecting large and small firms alike.  While firm-sponsored mentoring programs are helpful to new lawyers, a more traditional style of mentoring can also help firms keep their mid-level and senior associates satisfied and productive.  Burton provides steps for law firms to take in implementing this traditional, or organic, style of mentoring.


Paul Burton, Mentoring Your Practice: What Money Can’t Buy: A Strategy to Reintroduce Organic Mentoring in Firms, 67 The Oregon State Bar Bulletin 33 (2006) (LexisNexis search by citation: 67 Or. St. B. Bull. 33).


Part 2 of Burton’s article on reviving one-on-one mentoring in law firms discusses the characteristics of successful mentoring relationships, the mentor’s role, the protégé’s role, and matching up mentor and protégé.


Ann D. Carden, Mentoring and Adult Career Development: The Evolution of a Theory, 18 The Counseling Psychologist 2 (1990) (citation and annotation excerpt from Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs in Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (1997)).


Carden presents a general review of mentoring literature, including theory and research related to mentoring definitions, mentoring processes, and formal mentoring programs.  She also presents the merits and the drawbacks of formal mentoring programs in the public sector, in private organizations, and in education.


Georgia T. Chao, Pay M. Walz, & Phillip D. Gardner, Formal and Informal Mentorships: A Comparison of Mentoring Functions and Contrast with Nonmentored Counterparts, Personnel Psychology 45 (1992) (citation and annotation excerpt from Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs in Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (1997)).


This study compared three groups of individuals (212 protégés in informal mentoring relationships, 53 protégés in formal mentorships, and 284 individuals who did not have mentors) on three outcome variables (organizational socialization, job satisfaction, and salary), showing differences in outcomes between the mentored and nonmentored groups.


J. Barton Cunningham, Facilitating a Mentorship Programme, 14 Leadership & Organization Development Journal 4 (1993) (citation and annotation excerpt from Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs in Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (1997)).


Based on interviews with mentors and protégés, Cunningham cites key characteristics of successful mentoring programs and suggests several guidelines to be considered when developing a formal mentoring program.


Thomas J. DeLong, John G. Gabarro, Robert J. Lees, Why Mentoring Matters in a Hypercompetitive World, 2008 Harvard Business Review 115.


Eva Petko Esber, Nuts & Bolts: Everyday Mentoring in the Age of Technology, 31 Litigation 29 (2005) (LexisNexis search by citation: 31 Litigation 39).


Technology has completely altered the means by which we communicate, creating the potential for less personal interaction between senior and junior lawyers.  Firms are trying a variety of approaches with formal mentoring programs but more senior lawyers need to recognize themselves as worth natural mentors.  Natural mentoring is about the immediate give-and-take of reacting to each other when strategizing about a case.  We must continue to look for ways to maintain an active teaching component for new lawyers.


Gillian Flynn, Group Mentoring Solves Personality Conflicts, 74 Personnel Journal 8 (1995) (citation and annotation excerpt from Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs in Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (1997)).


Flynn describes a group mentoring model that helps avoid the potential personality conflicts involved in one-on-one formal mentoring relationships.


Marilynne M. Gray & William A. Gray, Planned Mentoring: Aiding Key Transitions in Career Development, 6 Career Planning and Adult development Journal 3 (1990) (citation and annotation excerpt from Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs in Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (1997)).


Formal mentoring programs can be divided into five categories based on the type of career transition, purpose, and participants.  The authors of this article describe these five categories as well as their own conclusions and insights regarding planned mentoring programs.


Beverly Kaye & Betsy Jacobson, Reframing Mentoring, 50 Training and Development 8 (1996) (citation and annotation excerpt from Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs in Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (1997)).


Based on an examination of mentoring successes and failures, the authors identify five building blocks for enhancing the effectiveness of formal mentoring programs and encourage organizations to adopt a group mentoring approach.


Susan G. Manch, Building Loyalty: The Relationship Between Mentoring and Retention, 60 The Oregon State Bar Bulletin 21 (2000) (LexisNexis search by citation: 60 Or. St. B. Bull. 21).


Having positive relationships between senior and junior attorneys in a firm helps improve moral and workplace satisfaction for both associates and partners.  Developing these types of relationships can be a challenge.  Understanding what characteristics have proven effective in mentoring relationships will help both sides of the mentoring relationship try hard enough to make the relationship work.


Mentor. Me?, Canadian Bar Association, March 2006, at http://www.cba.org/CBA/EPIIgram/March2006/default.aspx.


The Canadian Bar Association takes a look at the benefits of mentoring to the mentor and the mentee, the qualities that make someone an effective mentor, and ways for the mentee to get the most out of a mentor relationship.


Mentoring: A Guide to Corporate Programs and Practice, Catalyst (1993) (citation and annotation excerpt from Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs in Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (1997)).


This report provides an overview of formal mentoring programs within organizations and serves as a guide for development and designing such programs.  The authors also describe several successful mentoring programs at organizations such as CIGNA, Colgate-Palmolive, Dow Jones, and Proctor & Gamble.


Timothy J. Newby & Ashlyn Heide, The Value of Mentoring, 5 Performance Improvement Quarterly 4 (1992) (citation and annotation excerpt from Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs in Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (1997)).


The authors describe the major phases of an ideal mentoring program, along with an overview of program benefits nad guidelines for implementing successful programs.


Dan Pinnington, Mentoring Associates: It’s Simply Good for Business, Law Practice Today, August 2004, at http://www.abanet.org/1pm/1pt/articles/mgt08043.html.


Fostering a positive mentoring relationship requires effective communication and candid feedback.  Pinnington provides suggestions for providing constructive feedback, overcoming obstacles, making efficient use of time, and evaluating the relationship as it progresses.


Dan Pinnington, Mentoring: Its Time Has Come – Again, Law Practice Today, August 2004, at http://www.abanet.org/1pm/1pt/articles/mgt08041.html.


Mentoring has come back into vogue because, among other reasons, it makes good business sense.  Pinnington explains how mentoring today has changed from traditional mentoring styles, shows why mentoring is good for the legal profession, and dispels myths about mentoring.


Dan Pinnington, Preparing for a Mentoring Relationship, Law Practice Today, August 2004, at http://www.abanet.org/1pm/1pt/articles/mgt08042.html.


Every mentoring relationship is unique.  However, completing some groundwork can help create a stronger and more productive relationship.  Pinnington review the issues that mentors and mentees should consider as they prepare to engage in a mentoring relationship and provides an example of a written mentoring agreement.


Douglas B. Richardson, Making the Most of Mentoring, The Legal Intelligencer (2005) (Westlaw search by citation: 2/10/2005 Legal Intelligencer S4).


Richardson presents associate mentoring needs from the perspective of minority and women associates, noting that the key to a successful mentoring relationship is the mentee having clearly articulated his or her needs and expectations.  Associates should participate in the process of matching themselves up with a mentor. 


William E. Rosenbach, Mentoring: Empowering Followers to be Leaders, Contemporary Issues in Leadership (1993) (citation and annotation excerpt from Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs in Organizations: An Annotate Bibliography (1997)).


The author provides a general overview of mentoring within organizations that includes discussions of benefits to mentors, benefits to protégés, benefits to organizations, risks and problems, cross-gender and cross-race mentoring, and a comparison of informal and formal mentoring programs.


Stephanie Francis Ward, Coming of Age: When It Comes to Mentoring, Younger Is Sometimes Better, 90 ABA Journal 27 (2004) (LexisNexis search by citation: 90 A.B.A.J. 27).


A mentor does not have to be someone who is a lot older than the mentee.  Anyone with knowledge or expertise that is helpful to someone else can be a mentor.  Associates are sometimes better equipped than partners to advise new lawyers because they were in the new lawyer’s shoes not so long ago.


Rolf T. Wigand & Franklin S. Boster, Mentoring, Social Interaction and Commitment: An Empirical Analysis of a Mentoring Program, 16, Communications 1 (1991) (citation and annotation excerpt from Christina A. Douglas, Formal Mentoring Programs In Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (1997)).


The authors studied employees of a large U.S. corporation who had participated in a formal mentoring program to examine the relationships between an individual’s participation in a formal mentoring program and his or her individual outcomes.


Richard J. Yurko, Mentoring: A Guide for Both Sides, 47 Boston Bar Journal 16 (2003) (LexisNexis Search by citation: 47 B.B.J. 16).


Yurko provides guidelines for mentors and mentees to enhance the mentoring relationship.


Websites


 


http://www.mentoring.org/


http://www.mentoring-association.org/


The International Mentoring Association exists to facilitate growth and development through best practices in mentoring.  The IMA is housed at Western Michigan University, serving members from a broad cross-section of individuals in public and private institutions, and business and industry, all of whom support and promote planned mentoring.


 


Blogs


Amazing Firms, Amazing Practices


http://www.gerryriskin.com/


JD Bliss


http://www.jdblissblog.com


Legal Sanity


http://arnieherz.com/

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